HERE TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF EVERY HORSE, PONY AND DONKEY ACROSS THE COUNTRY

 

For over 127 years our charity has worked tirelessly to improve the quality of life of horses, ponies and donkeys across the country. One of the ways we have achieved this is by giving grants to fund a wide range of projects that help improve horses’ health or welfare.

In 1888 we agreed to endorse an ‘air collar’ product which had cured the sore shoulders of one of our residents, ‘Black Bess’. From these small beginnings our funding has gone on to become one of the UK’s leading funders of non-invasive equine veterinary research.

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Research funded by The Horse Trust has helped contribute to major advances in equine science, giving veterinarians greater understanding of the many diseases, injuries and ailments that affect the horse family. This knowledge helps improve the health and welfare of all horses.

It is th
anks to the generosity of our supporters we have been able to fund projects aimed to improve the health and welfare of every horse.

FACINGTHEFUTURE001 (copy 217px x 145px)Over the years we have been able to invest in providing top class clinical facilities in nearly all of the UK veterinary schools; an ongoing programme of postgraduate scholarship training and made an unparalleled contribution to ethical, cutting edge scientific research which has paved the way for major advances in the healthcare of horses worldwide.

The Horse Trust has supported ethical research projects FACINGTHEFUTURE003 (copy 108px x 145px)into a wide range of equine diseases and ailments including laminitis, sarcoids, digital flexor tendonitis, periodontal disease, drug resistance in parasites, strangles, equine herpesvirus, colic, degenerative joint disease, grass sickness and sweet itch.

This research has led to real life impacts in horse welfare such as major breakthroughs in our understanding and diagnoses of Strangles. This highly contagious respiratory infection is the most commonly diagnosed infectious disease in horses worldwide.  A grant from The Horse Trust helped the Animal Health Trust, the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute to sequence the genome of the bacterium which causes Strangles and to develop a blood test to diagnose the disease which is now in widespread use. This blood test can identify horses that are infected or carry the disease, so that they can be treated to prevent further spread of the infection. It is hoped that one day this research will also lead to an effective vaccine for the disease.

If you would like to help us improve health and welfare ADVERT-MPU-PLACEHOLDERand continue to meet the challenge of advancing excellence in equine care you can do that today by making a donation.