29/06/2010 The Horse Trust Appeals for Home for Young Piebald Gelding

Buckinghamshire charity The Horse Trust is looking for a home for Dancer, a young horse who came to the charity when his owner passed away.

Homes are sought in Buckinghamshire and the surrounding counties, including Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, Berkshire and Oxfordshire.

Dancer, a six-year-old 13.2hh piebald gelding lightweight cob, arrived at The Horse Trust last February. The charity is now hoping to find him a loving home.

“Dancer is a young horse who, unlike most of the horses we rehome, can be ridden,” said Liane Crowther, Welfare and Education Officer at The Horse Trust. “Dancer would be an ideal horse for a confident and experienced owner who is used to taking on and training unbroken horses. A young horse needs plenty of stimulation and interaction so we’re hoping to find him an active home. Because of his size, he would particularly suit an experienced teenager or lightweight adult.”

Dancer’s groom Lucy Twiss has spent time training Dancer since his arrival. He has been getting used to wearing a roller and bridle and is responding positively to voice commands. He had also been lunged and is lunging well.

“Dancer is a very expressive horse – he wiggles his nose like mad when he sees food or gets excited. He can be a bit jumpy sometimes, but has made a lot of progress in the short time he has been with us and he is very willing to learn,” said Lucy.

The Horse Trust launched its rehoming scheme in October 2009, after demand from desperate horse owners affected by the credit crunch. The scheme primarily focuses on rehoming retired, unridden horses from any background.

Since launching the scheme, The Horse Trust has had many requests from people who can no longer look after their horse. But, fewer people have come forward to offer a new home.

"We urgently need more homes for horses," said Liane. "By offering a home, you will be giving a horse a secure and happy life."

Due to limited resources, the charity primarily considers horses and homes within a 50 mile radius of the sanctuary. All horses and potential homes are visited to assess their suitability and the charity regularly visits the rehomed horse to ensure it is receiving an appropriate standard of care.